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How to solve ‘The NHS Problem’ (4)

Everybody cares, every day

This is the last of four posts which provide a new, more creative way of funding the NHS.

So far, I have proposed:

1. That NHS services be more clearly divided into ‘treatment’ and ‘care’
2. That NHS care services be integrated with – and managed by – the charity sector
3. Tax incentives to encourage people to contribute generously to a new National Care Service

Last time, I showed how the very rich could be incentivised by an income tax reduction to 30% subject to that sum being matched by a donation to the National Care Service (NCS). One ‘reward’ would be the allocation of naming rights to NCS homes, wings and wards.

Now, in this post, I will show how everybody can contribute to the NCS every day. Read More »

How to solve ‘The NHS Problem’ (3)

Give is better than take

Since I started this blog, I have promoted my view that, in society, we are all consumers – and that professional marketing and advertising, and ‘upstream creative thinking’, could be better employed for the good of society as a whole. All of us.

In 2008, a new book about marketing theory called Nudge was published. It showed how ‘behavioural insights’ could influence human behaviour.

In 2010, a Nudge Unit was established at the Cabinet Office ‘to use behavioural economics and market signals to persuade citizens to behave in a more socially integrated way.’

In 2014, the ‘nudge unit’ was ‘part-privatised‘. Read More »

How to solve ‘The NHS Problem’ (2)

Wholesale engagement with charity sector

Last time, I discussed the need for the NHS to differentiate between ‘treatment’ and ‘care’. In the last week, three stories have emerged to support this view:

1. Families are being told they have seven days to find their relative a space in a care home – or risk being taken to court (Daily Mail)

Dr Paul Flynn, chairman of the British Medical Association’s consultant committee, said: ‘Pressure on NHS services is at a critical point and cracks are beginning to appear.’

2. Care for people with learning disabilities is ‘failing’, report says (BBC News) Read More »

How to solve ‘The NHS Problem’ (1)

Isolate ‘care’ from ‘cure’

This is the first in a short series of posts about the NHS.

As a country, the NHS is the biggest issue we face. If we leave it to the politicians – you know, the people who don’t know that invoices for £1.7billion are coming through the door – the NHS could bankrupt us.

Bizarrely, we all know this could happen.

But no one knows what to do about it – or has the guts to take the decisions that need taking.

There are two irreconcilable forces: Read More »

The importance of customer service (2)

The man dozed.

For the first time in over a year, he could lie in late in bed. Time to rest from the hassles of home. Phew. Two weeks alone on the Greek Island he loved and

Bang! Bang! ‘Cleaning!’

Bang! Bang! ‘Cleaning!’

The man hauled himself out the bed and his day dreams. He grabbed his favourite kikoy from the bottom of the bed, wrapped it around the middle of his body and opened the door of his perfectly comfortable hotel room. Read More »

How an advertising agency could help defeat Islamic State

On 4 October, Lord Dannatt, who was introduced as a former ‘Chief of The General Staff and Head of the Army for several years and knows the Middle East well’, was interviewed on BBC Radio 4.

He said:

‘We are all united in the fact that the so called Islamic State, and these ISIL fighters, are an abomination and they have got to be confronted and they have got to be faced down….

This has to be looked at at several levels. Yes, of course there is a military level….. Read More »

A more creative approach to welfare reform could have saved lives

So, while the UK was talking about Scotland, someone has died:

David Clapson’s awful death was the result of grotesque government policies (9 September)

‘The DWP brags about ending the ‘something for nothing’ culture, but benefit sanctions punish the unemployed, disabled and poor in ways that are utterly inhumane.’

Family calls for benefit inquiry after David Clapson death

‘Diabetic David Clapson, 59, from Stevenage, died from lack of insulin, 18 days after his Jobseeker’s Allowance was suspended in July. He was found dead in his flat on 20 July, with £3.44 in his bank account.’

I have posted on this topic before: Read More »

Why the Scots would be mad to vote for independence (not that I care)

So, next week the Scots will decide if they want to be independent.

Let me start by declaring a lack of interest in this issue. A complete lack of interest. I think may be one-eighth Scottish but I really don’t care if I have Scottish blood coursing through my veins. It hasn’t affected my life either way.

I have been to Scotland a handful of times. I have watched a couple of rugby internationals in Edinburgh and stayed with some friends in the Borders which was good fun. I may have been to Glasgow once to be on local radio but I really can’t remember. Nor can I be bothered to find out. It really doesn’t matter either way.

I wonder how many Scots have heard of ‘ASEAN’?

ASEAN stands for the ‘Association of South East Asian Nations’. It is the Asian equivalent of the EU. And, Scot or not, you need to know about ASEAN. Especially now. Read More »

When all you can do is play the ball that is bowled to you

To many of us, especially those of us who lived through those days, the TV series Mad Men has been essential viewing. We have come to know the character Don Draper, played by John Hamm, like a friend. And now, this week, Hamm’s new film Million Dollar Arm has come to London. And it’s about cricket! Wahaay! Have the Americans seen the light?

Now, if you don’t play cricket, I am sorry. Please bear with me. Who knows, the lesson in this post might change your life, just as a cricket ball can end it. Read More »

Long Lost Families and Masters of Sex

The most interesting thing in the world is people. And, talking about interesting, which we were, and people, which we are, there is a peculiar juxtaposition in two TV series currently on air.

For me, and anyone with personal experience of adoption, a must-watch TV programme is Long Lost Family where people separated by adoption at birth are reunited with the parents they have never met – usually their mother.

It is shocking to learn about the attitudes to pregnancy that prevailed in the lifetimes of two generations of people still living today. For, until the 1960s/70s, pregnancy represented a harsh and unforgiving world where babies of only a few weeks old were torn, literally ripped away, from the arms of their screaming, desperate mothers who, typically, were still teenagers. Read More »

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