Tag Archives: divergence

Olympic success defines a new Britain for the 21st Century

The subject of my first blog, over three years ago, was ‘Convergence and Divergence’. It discussed an observation made, over twenty years ago, at an international business conference by a heavy-hitting American banker, a breed we respected at the time. He said:

‘Over time, convergence is more likely than divergence’. 

Watching the Olympics, I have asked myself time after time, lap after lap, if he was right. And I have concluded that no, I don’t think he was. It seems both have happened. We have converged and we have diverged.

How so? Read more on Olympic success defines a new Britain for the 21st Century…

Humanity can overcome technology

Two days. Two media channels. Two writers.

Alain de Botton is an eminent philosopher who has written ‘How Proust Can Change Your Life’, ‘The Consolations of Philosophy’ and ‘The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work’. Last week, he tweeted: ‘What used to happen to outrage before the net gave it a home?’

Charles Vallance is the V, some say the brains, of VCCP – anointed last week as ‘the most ‘in-demand’ shop’ (viz advertising  agency) in London. Last week, he published a column in Campaign magazine headed: ‘The web is stifling radicalism at a time when it is needed.’

Two clever geezers. What are they on about? Read more on Humanity can overcome technology…

NHS – government engages with strategic marketing at last

My first ever blog as ‘A Different Hat’ on this site was posted on 13 November 2009.
It was called ‘Convergence and Divergence’.

After setting up my core thesis, I said: Read more on NHS – government engages with strategic marketing at last…

Was it worth it?

By standing up to be counted as an Independent Candidate MP, I certainly learnt some home truths, both professionally (which you might not like) and personally (which you might not care about). 

So yes, of course it was worth it. Well I am not going to say ‘no’ am I? 

Read more on Was it worth it?…

What was it like?

So, I have this nagging concern that, with the major social battles of the 20th century fought and won – women’s suffrage, equal rights, free market economics over socialism – and, especially, with all this new media about – why, in the 21st century, is our society diverging rather than converging? 

And why aren’t our politicians more sophisticated, more strategic, about how they use these new media opportunities to bring people closer together and unite society – globally as well as domestically. Read more on What was it like?…

General Election Update 30 April 2010

 

Many of you have been kind enough to enquire about the progress of my campaign so I thought I would provide you with some Bank Holiday reading. Read more on General Election Update 30 April 2010…

Read more on General Election Update 30 April 2010…

What is wrong with UK politics

This reads more like a letter than a blog but, hey, I am going to post it anyway. And you’ve got a few days off to read it if you want to. 

First of all, many thanks to all of my friends in our industry who have reacted so positively to the announcement last week that I am going to be standing as an Independent MP at the General Election. I have been overwhelmed by your support and am extremely grateful to all who have donated to my fighting fund at www.hughsalmon4battersea.co.uk Read more on What is wrong with UK politics…

Convergence and Divergence

Two decades ago, I was privileged to attend a conference in Bangkok where the Key Note Speaker was the CEO of a major American Bank. He may even have been The President. Certainly, he was very important. He had a bodyguard and he arrived in his Bank’s private plane (as it was private, he probably kept it for himself).

His thesis was that ‘Over time, convergence is more likely than divergence’. In other words, all of us would grow closer together – culturally, educationally, religiously, morally, in every way.

I thought this was really clever. The Asian markets were booming, Vietnam was opening up and curious. And certainly there was much more regional awareness. Asian countries knew much more about what was happening in their region than we did in Europe. Above all, there was massive demand for ‘international’ products and brands.

Two weeks ago, I read ‘A Week in December’ by Sebastian Faulks. Set in modern-day Britain, the book exposes a society that couldn’t be more polarised – culturally, educationally, religiously or morally, in every way. Read more on Convergence and Divergence…

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