Tag Archives: Labour

Benefit cuts: a call to mobilise the disabled

So now we are here in another New Year and, in the UK, the savagery of social welfare cuts continues to slice through our society.

We have had:

06 January: ‘Soldiers, nurses and teachers hit by benefit curbs’ 

07 January: ‘Benefit cuts will see more children taken into care’

09 January: ‘Pensioners could face universal benefit cuts after election’ 

13 January: ‘Benefit cuts threaten women’s refuge services’ 

14 January: ‘Benefit cuts: reforms will leave disabled people ghettoised and excluded’

Happy New Year from the British Government! Read more on Benefit cuts: a call to mobilise the disabled…

Property values divide the nation

Last week Labour leader Ed Miliband spent over an hour telling us two things: that he wants us to be ‘one nation’ and that he went to comprehensive school.

I quite like the ‘one nation’ thing building, as it does, on our Olympic success and burying, as it should, Labour’s bigoted tribal heritage.

But isn’t there a contradiction in Miliband’s exposition of ‘one nation’ and, in the same speech, his need to remind us of his comprehensive schooling? If we are to be ‘one nation’ why drive an educational wedge between us?

And haven’t these people read what I told them last week?!  Read more on Property values divide the nation…

How the Banks can save the NHS

In June last year, I posted an insight to solve the NHS problem which, given the cost of the NHS is forecast to increase from £130bn in 2015 to £260bn in 2030, is a big one.

At the time, David Cameron had stepped in and put the Bill on ‘pause’.

This must have been a bore to Health Secretary, Andrew Lansley, who had dreamt up a Bill without, it seems, due research or consultation with the medical profession.

Today, we now find this Bill, more formally the Health and Social Care Bill, is back in ‘forward’ mode or, more accurately, ‘slow forward’ mode. Read more on How the Banks can save the NHS…

‘Role of Government’ in a capitalist society

I cannot believe our politicians have only just realised that the ‘Role of Government’ in a capitalist society is the most fundamental problem they need to solve.

It shows an extraordinary lack of leadership and vision.

I can say this, rather immodestly, because it is exactly what I told them over four years ago – long before the last General Election. Here’s my story…. Read more on ‘Role of Government’ in a capitalist society…

Catch-22 of a rotten political system

It is legitimate to discuss political parties as brands. After three weeks of party Conferences, the Liberal Democrats, Labour and Conservative parties have shown the world their wares and their performance has been open to debate (sic).

I understand the Party conferences were so overcome by lobbyists and commercial interests that, last week, the Prime Minister was talking to a half-empty hall. Open debate indeed.

Surely the management of the economy, and the good of the people, is fundamentally important to marketing and the marketing services businesses? In a strong economy, consumers spend more money and hence oil the wheels of the economy, which encourages people to spend more. One follows the other. Everybody is better off. Read more on Catch-22 of a rotten political system…

Conservatives a careless brand

Last week, I dutifully recorded Ed Miliband’s speech at the Labour Conference.

I watched it in the evening and stayed up late writing my post only to find that, apart from the unique human insights to which you are accustomed, most of my views were reflected across the mass media.

“Get a life”, said the wife. So less to read this week, you will be pleased to hear.

In 2007, I advised the Conservatives how to win the last election. You can read it here: ‘The Conservatives may be doing the right thing, but in the wrong way’. In the same post, months before the riots, I told them the human effect of their savage cuts would be social chaos. Alienating people is not good leadership. Read more on Conservatives a careless brand…

Labour a confused brand

This week it is Labour’s turn to make us cringe. 

At ‘Conference’ (cringe), did Ed Miliband clarify his own position and his party’s positioning, for surely the two are intertwined?

The answer, as with all these interchangeable career politicians, is that it is very difficult to pin down what they stand for. You have to go by what they say.

But how much of what they say can you believe?

Are they people of conviction and integrity – or do they put their own careers first (even before family)? I think we all know the answer. Read more on Labour a confused brand…

Labour opportunity after AV vote?

Only a year ago I was out there electioneering as an Independent Candidate in the
last General Election. The reasons I did this were explained here at the time.

In short, alongside many other Independents, I thought the MPs expenses scandal
was an issue that called into account their personal – and collective – integrity.

Surely they could not have each, individually, worked out that they were able to evade
Capital Gains Tax by ‘flipping’ their houses? Did not one of them think of raising a
hand to say there was something wrong in this behaviour? Unbelievable. Criminal. Read more on Labour opportunity after AV vote?…

Caroline Spelman a metaphor for tumbling Coalition

I wonder if the people of our country know what a seminal week this has been?

The Government have been forced into an embarrassing climbdown (sic) from the sale of forests and woodland.

The Right Honourable Caroline Spelman, Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, told the House of Commons: “I am sorry. We got this one wrong, but we have listened to people’s concerns.” Read more on Caroline Spelman a metaphor for tumbling Coalition…

The Conservatives may be doing the right thing, but in the wrong way

With all these massive changes in the our social welfare system going on, I wonder if they are being communicated with honesty and, in particular, if the Conservative element of the Coalition couldn’t be transmitting their message in a less damaging way to their brand?

Here’s my story (sorry it’s another long one):

In 2007 a professional contact, who has become a personal friend of mine, happened to be appointed to head up one of the Study Review Groups in Iain Duncan Smith’s Centre for Social Justice.

He asked me if I would run my eye over his team’s final report. I won’t say which one but it is an area of society in which I have some experience and expertise. And I like to think he asked me because he would value the wisdom of my input. Read more on The Conservatives may be doing the right thing, but in the wrong way…

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